ULI Receives National Building Museum’s Honor Award; Gala Keynoter Steve Case Predicts “Sharing Economy” Will Change Real Estate and Land Use Industry

For more information, contact Trish Riggs at 202-624-7086.

WASHINGTON (March 16, 2012) — The business of real estate and community building will be permanently transformed by the evolution of the “sharing economy,” an era in which non-personal items such as cars and office space will be shared with increasing frequency by urban residents, according to internationally renowned communications technology entrepreneur and philanthropist Steve Case. The co-founder of America Online (AOL) was the keynote speaker last night at the National Building Museum’s Honor Award gala, which recognized ULI as the 2012 Honor Award recipient. The award recognizes ULI’s 75-year legacy of leadership in land use and innovative community building worldwide.

To stay relevant in the 21st century, the institute must consider how the real estate and land use industry is being affected by ubiquitous internet use that is changing every aspect of people’s lives, said Case, who left AOL in 2003 and is now chairman and chief executive officer of the Revolution company, which invests in consumer-oriented businesses such as Zipcar. The success of Zipcar – an auto-sharing service that provides quick, convenient access to cars for brief periods — illustrates the growing preference for sharing, Case said. “The millennial generation is much more interested in the experience of sharing than ownership…This is a profound trend and we are only in the early phases of it,” he said. With its global reach, ULI is well-positioned to leverage the potential of technology to benefit the industry and communities as a whole, he said.

The National Building Museum gala, attended by nearly 650 land use leaders and guests, included a video tribute to ULI from President Clinton. “From Hong Kong to Houston, from Los Angeles to London, ULI’s guidance is trusted and effective,” he said. “In a world transformed by technology and economic globalization, the world’s cities need ULI’s wisdom now more than ever. We are all the better for your dedication, your perseverance, and your commitment to creating a more sustainable world.”

ULI, with nearly 30,000 members worldwide, provides the private and public sectors with pragmatic land use expertise and education through research, publications, and professional development. Throughout its history, it has continued to serve as the preeminent forum for local, national, and international industry leaders and policy makers to exchange ideas, information, and experience.

ULI Chairman Peter S. Rummell and ULI Chief Executive Officer Patrick L. Phillips accepted the Honor Award on behalf of the institute. “The National Building Museum is an American treasure. This award is an extreme honor,” Rummell said, noting that the award will inspire ULI as it leads community building for the 21 century. “The past 75 years of ULI are prologue. What is most interesting is how we think about the next 75 years, how we adapt to change, and what ULI becomes as we go forward,” Rummell said.

“The National Building Museum and ULI share a commitment to excellence in the building of great places, in forging a path toward more vibrant, resilient cities,” Phillips said. “ULI’s selection as the 2012 recipient of the Honor Award is a wonderful validation of the unwavering, worldwide commitment by our members, sponsors, and staff to excellence in community building.”

“The Museum’s Honor Award recognizes leaders who have defined our culture, developed our communities, and crafted our built environment,” said Chase W. Rynd, president and executive director of the National Building Museum. “We salute the Urban Land Institute for its longstanding commitment to multi-disciplinary, nonpartisan research that impacts the built environment. With this award, we applaud ULI as a leading voice for smart growth and for strategies that go beyond bricks and mortar to enhance the quality of life in the world’s urban communities.”

About the Honor Award
The National Building Museum bestowed its first Honor Award in 1986 to recognize individuals and organizations that have made important contributions to the nation’s building heritage. Recipients are selected from a wide variety of backgrounds to call attention to the many factors that determine the form and quality of the built environment. Past honorees include Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Cindy and Jay Pritzker, DuPont, Related, and The Associated General Contractors of America.

About the Urban Land Institute and the National Building Museum
The Urban Land Institute (uli.org) is a global nonprofit education and research institute supported by its members. Its mission is to provide leadership inThe National Building Museum is America’s leading cultural institution dedicated to advancing the quality of the built environment by educating people about its impact on their lives. Through its exhibitions, educational programs, online content, and publications, the Museum has become a vital forum for the exchange of ideas and information about the world we build for ourselves. Public inquiries: 202.272.2448 or visit www.nbm.org.