About Daniel Lobo

Daniel Lobo is the Director of Awards, Education and Advisory Group, for the Urban Land Institute, a nonprofit education and research institute that focuses on issues of land use, real estate and urban development. The mission on the Institute is to providing leadership in the responsible use of land and in creating and sustaining thriving communities worldwide. Since 1947, ULI has been conducting panels that provide strategic advice to communities and organizations on a wide variety of real estate, planning, and urban design and public policy subjects. Lobo is an urban planning and design professional with over twelve years of experience dedicated to built environment initiatives, an extensive track record in project management, community participation, sustainable neighborhood development, disaster preparedness and response, cultural engagement, freelance reporting, and art proposals. Prior to joining ULI Mr. Lobo was and independent consultant working as project manager for a variety of urban and research initiatives, in particular facilitating open cultural urban interventions internationally, and new media research. Earlier he worked extensively as project manager for the Center for Communities by Design at the American Institute of Architects, and as Urban Designer at Skidmore, Owings, and Merrill LLP. He holds a MSc City Design and Social Science from the London School of Economics, and a BA (Hons) from the School of Architecture and Interior Design at London Metropolitan University.

ULI Hines Competition 2015 Finalist: “Tremé 2.0″ – Harvard University

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“Planning a community’s future lies on unlocking its past. The project Tremé 2.0 lays at the southern tip of the old Tremé district, one of New Orleans’ first urbanized neighborhoods outside of the Vieux Carre Rampart. In the 1810s, Tremé’s development had not only connected the city’s cultural center with the vast natural hinterland for the first time, but also created a new urban lifestyle for the New Orleanians of the 19th century. Today, the proposed 23 acre development project expects Tremé to continue its great tradition to make innovative transformation to the Crescent City, as it did 200 years ago.”…
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ULI Hines Competition 2015 Finalist: “The Crossing” – University of Maryland

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“Planning a community’s future lies on unlocking its past. The project Tremé 2.0 lays at the southern tip of the old Tremé district, one of New Orleans’ first urbanized neighborhoods outside of the Vieux Carre Rampart. In the 1810s, Tremé’s development had not only connected the city’s cultural center with the vast natural hinterland for the first time, but also created a new urban lifestyle for the New Orleanians of the 19th century. Today, the proposed 23 acre development project expects Tremé to continue its great tradition to make innovative transformation to the Crescent City, as it did 200 years ago.”…
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ULI Hines Competition 2015 Finalist: “Quartier Vert” – University of Wisconsin-Madison, and University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

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“Planning a community’s future lies on unlocking its past. The project Tremé 2.0 lays at the southern tip of the old Tremé district, one of New Orleans’ first urbanized neighborhoods outside of the Vieux Carre Rampart. In the 1810s, Tremé’s development had not only connected the city’s cultural center with the vast natural hinterland for the first time, but also created a new urban lifestyle for the New Orleanians of the 19th century. Today, the proposed 23 acre development project expects Tremé to continue its great tradition to make innovative transformation to the Crescent City, as it did 200 years ago.”…
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ULI Hines Competition 2015 Finalist: “Claiborne Grove” – Harvard University

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“Planning a community’s future lies on unlocking its past. The project Tremé 2.0 lays at the southern tip of the old Tremé district, one of New Orleans’ first urbanized neighborhoods outside of the Vieux Carre Rampart. In the 1810s, Tremé’s development had not only connected the city’s cultural center with the vast natural hinterland for the first time, but also created a new urban lifestyle for the New Orleanians of the 19th century. Today, the proposed 23 acre development project expects Tremé to continue its great tradition to make innovative transformation to the Crescent City, as it did 200 years ago.”…
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